Our Game Lures
We are not yet marketing the patented lures, preferring to further perfect them. They are quite effective, so a question of fair hunting ethics arises. Also, one of the lures uses an active light, and active lighting is illegal in many states. The active illumination lure was primarily developed to be used by authorities for attracting and culling deer when they reach p est concentrations. The photographs illustrate the attraction of deer to the fractal geometric shape (yellow color spot) and specific wavelength animal color recognition radiance, and the radiation lure (seen by camera as bright blue). The colors are not truly representative of the radiation wavelengths as deer and elk see them; film and digital cameras are designed to show colors as humans see colors. I have researched a new type of big game animal lure in the past twenty years. It is based on a new form of geometry, animal curiosity and behavior, and on the way animals perceive their world. Most current lures focus on the sexual attractants of estrus urine or realistic illustrations of animals (decoys). My lure largely ignores these human interpretations of what animals should respond to. Instead, I focus on how an animal recognizes what is out of context with their surroundings, but appears "somehow familiar" enough to their vision capabilities to be curiously interesting. It is not the attractiveness of a lure that humans that counts, but what the animals are able to see and perceive as an attractant. The lure is mathematically calculated to fit a particular species in terms of a relatively new geometry called Fractal Geometry. International Business Machines hired the mathematician Benoit Mandlebrot to devise a new way to look at natural objects, actions, and processes. Mandlebrot tried to define the coastline of England in typical Euclidian geometry. This uses lines, circles, triangles, boxes, radian angles and dimensions to describe an object. It best constructs what we humans see, but it is actually just an approximation in human values of what is really there. Mandelbrot's coastline studies produced a profound conclusion. No matter at what scale you looked at the coastline, the view had the same shape. Look at the coast from space, from an airplane, from a cliff, or while walking on the beach, and the outline has the same basic attributes. What Mandelbrot recognized was that it was not the object that needed to be defined, but the process that created the object. Wave action created the coastlines, and the coastlines represent the erosional processes working on the specific type of rocks. Popular fractal geometry appeared in artwork and as T-shirt designs. The designs were created by simple mathematical formulas that were done over and over again at different scales. These repetitive calculations are called iterations. Now fractal use has permeated our daily lives. Remember the cumbersome, large radio antennas that were strung from poles, and later car radio antennas, and then backpack sized satellite antennas? Now you have a satellite receiver antenna in a wrist watch or digital camera. Scientists found that the angularity of an antenna was its basis for capturing electromagnetic waves. Programing a computer to make successively smaller triangles on a computer chip results in a stupendously efficient antenna for low energy radio wave concentration. Mandelbrot then realized that iterations in nature produced the natural object. For example, consider a seedling sprout emerging from the soil. It responds to nutrients, warmth and sunlight. As it grows, its genetic code begins to reiterate. A side sprout shoots off. In the proper time it and the main stem again send off side shoots. These become branches, to be iterated into leaves, and eventually a tree. Each tree has its own genetic code. Its shape, branches, bark, leaf shape, and leaf color are the result of the genetic-driven process of formation. While each tree in an oak grove may be slightly different, they have a shape of process - which is the fractal dimension of all oak trees of a given oak species. Now lets consider how we know one group of trees is oak, another maple and a third ponderosa pine. Do we demand to get closer to the trees, or even feel or climb them? Do we mentally get out our Euclidian geometry and analyze each grove to arrive at a conclusion? No, we just intuitively know what is right for separating the tree species. We are using our natural cognitive ability to recognize each tree's fractal dimension without knowing we are doing so. We know what is similar to an object(s), independent of scale (closeness). That is what animals do. Moreover, in my opinion animals instantly recognize what is not in fractal geometrical balance; in other words something that is out of "harmony". In my book I stress the goal of becoming so familiar with the hunt area that you unconsciously are alerted to out of balance clues. This is what I term the Proximity Factor. You just know game is present. Motion also has a fractal dimension. That is because motion is is created by interaction of ALL the geometrical elements of the moving object. For example, all bones and muscles of a particular living being. Let's assume you are hunting and see several identically shaped, sized and clothed hunters walking along 500 yards away. Just about five seconds after you see the group you gasp - the third one is a woman! Without thinking you analyzed and evaluated the situation to conclude one is a woman. What actually happened is that you recognized woman are anatomically build differently and therefore move differently. More to the point, women have a wider pelvis for giving birth, and breasts which affect upper torso movement. Your past experience seeing women move subconsciously recognized the movement similarity. Our elk lure incorporates this species-specific movement similarity. This movement similarity can be mimiced and used when hunting elk. For exapmle, some Indians learned to dismount their horse and nudge it toward grazing elk. The Indian would walk beside the horse and imitate the slow leg, arm and head and track movements of his grazing horse. Coercing his horse gently in the direction of elk, the Indian could get close enough for a bow or even spear shot. Now consider how you might stalk on foot or horse mount. Is it slow and consistent with the movements of the surroundings through which you are traveling? (I give a lot of hunt savvy to Indians in my book, and stress that a hunter must know the animals well to be the most successful.)r I've gone deep enough into fractal geometry to explain my lure. I have measured deer and elk to determine their fractal dimension. This calculated value was used to create an object that just looks terribly familiar to elk and deer, but still odd enough to attract their curiosity. "If it is not an elk, then what is it?", they might think. Let me give you a human hunting example for comparison. It is falling light and you are looking toward a field of stumps. You scan for elk. One stump catches your attention. You squint, patiently watch for movement, and wait. Of all the many stumps, your subconscious mind tells you this looks like an elk. The many traits of this stump combined together makes it a prime suspect. It fits your subconscious idea of what an elk looks like. The lures also incorporate light wavelengths that ungulates are able to see. These colors (many not visible to humans) are used in spectral concentrations which are exciting to the game species. A reverse example is the fluorescent hunting vest. Humans instantly vision instantly fixates on the safety vest orange fluorescent color, because the color is not natural. Yet game only see brightness against a dark background of trees. In the same way, animals see the lures. (Left) Five cow elk approach the lure in early morning, stare at it for a while, and then retreat back into the trees. ( (Above) Cow elk approach the lure, stand, mill, retreat, and then go to the right. A bull approached the lure later, stopped to stare at it, and soon filled our freezer. Note: Our patented lures are completing development, but are not available yet for purchase. . Our summer “research laboratory”. Stop by and say hello if you see it.
Lure
© 2019 Copyright by P. K. H. Groth, Denver, Colorado, USA All rights reserved - See contact page
Our Game Lures
We are not yet marketing the patented lures, preferring to further perfect them. They are quite effective, so a question of fair hunting ethics arises. Also, one of the lures uses an active light, and active lighting is illegal in many states. The active illumination lure was primarily developed to be used by authorities for attracting and culling deer when they reach p est concentrations. The photographs illustrate the attraction of deer to the fractal geometric shape (yellow color spot) and specific wavelength animal color recognition radiance, and the radiation lure (seen by camera as bright blue). The colors are not truly representative of the radiation wavelengths as deer and elk see them; film and digital cameras are designed to show colors as humans see colors. I have researched a new type of big game animal lure in the past twenty years. It is based on a new form of geometry, animal curiosity and behavior, and on the way animals perceive their world. Most current lures focus on the sexual attractants of estrus urine or realistic illustrations of animals (decoys). My lure largely ignores these human interpretations of what animals should respond to. Instead, I focus on how an animal recognizes what is out of context with their surroundings, but appears "somehow familiar" enough to their vision capabilities to be curiously interesting. It is not the attractiveness of a lure that h u m a n s t h a t c o u n t s , but what t h e a n i m a l s are able to see a n d p e r c e i v e as an attractant. The lure is mathematically calculated to fit a particular species in terms of a relatively new geometry called Fractal Geometry. International Business Machines hired the mathematician Benoit Mandlebrot to devise a new way to look at natural objects, actions, and processes. Mandlebrot tried to define the coastline of England in typical Euclidian geometry. This uses lines, circles, triangles, boxes, radian angles and dimensions to describe an object. It best constructs what we humans see, but it is actually just an approximation in human values of what is really there. Mandelbrot's coastline studies produced a profound conclusion. No matter at what scale you looked at the coastline, the view had the same shape. Look at the coast from space, from an airplane, from a cliff, or while walking on the beach, and the outline has the same basic attributes. What Mandelbrot recognized was that it was not the object that needed to be defined, but the process that created the object. Wave action created the coastlines, and the coastlines represent the erosional processes working on the specific type of rocks. Popular fractal geometry appeared in artwork and as T-shirt designs. The designs were created by simple mathematical formulas that were done over and over again at different scales. These repetitive calculations are called iterations. Now fractal use has permeated our daily lives. Remember the cumbersome, large radio antennas that were strung from poles, and later car radio antennas, and then backpack sized satellite antennas? Now you have a satellite receiver antenna in a wrist watch or digital camera. Scientists found that the angularity of an antenna was its basis for capturing electromagnetic waves. Programing a computer to make successively smaller triangles on a computer chip results in a stupendously efficient antenna for low energy radio wave concentration. Mandelbrot then realized that iterations in nature produced the natural object. For example, consider a seedling sprout emerging from the soil. It responds to nutrients, warmth and sunlight. As it grows, its genetic code begins to reiterate. A side sprout shoots off. In the proper time it and the main stem again send off side shoots. These become branches, to be iterated into leaves, and eventually a tree. Each tree has its own genetic code. Its shape, branches, bark, leaf shape, and leaf color are the result of the genetic-driven process of formation. While each tree in an oak grove may be slightly different, they have a shape of process - which is the fractal dimension of all oak trees of a given oak species. Now lets consider how we know one group of trees is oak, another maple and a third ponderosa pine. Do we demand to get closer to the trees, or even feel or climb them? Do we mentally get out our Euclidian geometry and analyze each grove to arrive at a conclusion? No, we just intuitively know what is right for separating the tree species. We are using our natural cognitive ability to recognize each tree's fractal dimension without knowing we are doing so. We know what is similar to an object(s), independent of scale (closeness). That is what animals do. Moreover, in my opinion animals instantly recognize what is not in fractal geometrical balance; in other words something that is out of "harmony". In my book I stress the goal of becoming so familiar with the hunt area that you unconsciously are alerted to out of balance clues. This is what I term the Proximity Factor. You just know game is present. Motion also has a fractal dimension. That is because motion is is created by interaction of ALL the geometrical elements of the moving object. For example, all bones and muscles of a particular living being. Let's assume you are hunting and see several identically shaped, sized and clothed hunters walking along 500 yards away. Just about five seconds after you see the group you gasp - the third one is a woman! Without thinking you analyzed and evaluated the situation to conclude one is a woman. What actually happened is that you recognized woman are anatomically build differently and therefore move differently. More to the point, women have a wider pelvis for giving birth, and breasts which affect upper torso movement. Your past experience seeing women move subconsciously recognized the movement similarity. Our elk lure incorporates this species-specific movement similarity. This movement similarity can be mimiced and used when hunting elk. For exapmle, some Indians learned to dismount their horse and nudge it toward grazing elk. The Indian would walk beside the horse and imitate the slow leg, arm and head and track movements of his grazing horse. Coercing his horse gently in the direction of elk, the Indian could get close enough for a bow or even spear shot. Now consider how you might stalk on foot or horse mount. Is it slow and consistent with the movements of the surroundings through which you are traveling? (I give a lot of hunt savvy to Indians in my book, and stress that a hunter must know the animals well to be the most successful.)r
© 2016 -2017 Copyright by P. K. H. Groth, Denver, Colorado, USA All rights reserved - See contact page.
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