© 2019 Copyright by P. K. H. Groth, Denver, Colorado, USA All rights reserved - See contact page
Foot and Ankle Hunter Problems
Pay for a Good, Perfectly Fitted Boots Or Suffer Later: I nvest in a good pair of boots for comfort and foot preservation. Make sure they are correctly fitted. They should have strong, thick Vibram soles, and have strong built-in arch support to prevent foot failure and permanent flat feet. A poor or absent arch support will also shift more body weight to the heel bottom, resulting in gradual growth of an exceedingly painful basal bone spur that may take years to get rid of. Boots should extend over and be supportive of the ankle to reduce sprains Custom Boots Fitted by Experts are Worth the Cost: People buy boots today by mail order or from a local sports store which has inexperienced salespersons. Most will never experience the wonders of perfectly fitted boots, and some will suffer future foot and ankle problems. We relocated to Denver in 1969. New backpacking friends vehemently declared we should get the best boots plus free advice from Hans the German, an eighty year old (and still playing soccer) legendary boot maker on East Colfax Avenue. He was an extremely rare find from the “old school”. If you were coming to him, you were going to receive boots that were appropriate to HIS liking. The first thing he did was to yell at his wife to prepare another customer (he was always politely but loudly yelling commands to his wife.) Linda was properly seated in a fitting chair barefooted with her old boots neatly beside her. Hans intermittently eyed her as he went about business with other customers. Hans carefully looked at Linda’s feet and then her old boots. “How bad is the pain in the left side of your neck?” he asked (actually, a tort German command). Linda had this neck pain for years and Hans instantly detected it. He knew the adage “Look at a man’s shoes and you know how he lives”. Linda got a perfect pair of boots for her narrow feet. Hans made and glued a wedge-shaped leather “cookie” at a certain place inside her boot. In a week or two, her neck pain disappeared and never returned! Hans refused to sell me the impressive stylish hiking boots I selected, demanding I buy a more farmer-looking rugged type for my “German-Italian fat feet!”. I used those relaxing boots that felt like slippers through five resolings. (Note: Peter Limmer and Sons in New Hampshire make custom boots for hard to fit feet. It may take up to three years for the boots to be made. However, they will order contract-made specialty-to-fit boots made in the former East Germany with arrival time in weeks.) . Buy Quality Boot Laces for Comfort and Safety - Good Boot Laces Are Almost Worth Their Weight in Gold! T he backcountry is not the place to wear poor grade bootlaces.There are many cheap ones on the market that stretch, break of loose their end caps. They fray, absorb water and freeze, and creep through boot eyelets. Obtain some Obenauf’s Industrial Strength Boot Laces. These quality laces are impregnated with a beeswax/resin/oil mixture. This reduces abrasion, fraying, mildew, heat and chemical damage and water saturation. Water proofed laces do not ice up and become difficult to untie. The waterproofing composition also reduces or eliminates the creeping of laces through eyelets, and thus keeps your laces tight around the foot. Properly Tie Your Boot Laces for Maximum Comfort and Foot Safety: Boot maker Hans had a big granite rock in his boot store’s tiny fitting room. You climbed on and around that rock to his commands as he observed the boots flexing and the ankles moving. Then he would teach like a child you learn how to correctly lace a boot for backpacking. This photo illustrates the proper way to tie a boot so the foot and ankle are not injured or fatigued, or a good boot ruined. The lace is pulled increasingly tighter each eyelet at a time until the break in the ankle is reached. Then the laces are wrapped around each other several times BELOW the lowest point of boot flexure (arrows). This intertwining prevents the foot’s flexing action from pulling and stretching the upper lacers downward to loosen the lower laces. The boot front retains firm lacing, thus preventing the foot from moving forward, and foot tarsal bones from spreading. You will experience less foot fatigue, toes hitting the boot front, and better walking balance. The foot will not slip forward in the boot when walking downhill; this is a dangerous time when carrying a heavy load of meat. The boot will be able to bend better at the ankle break point, and this will prevent blistering of the tender ankle front. Note: Never use lacers which stretch at all. They allow foot slippage resulting in blisters. Observations: In 2006 I encountered a limping hunter gritting his teeth as he began the descent to the valley below. He had sprained his right ankle. One look at his boots explained the cause - he had worn borrowed old boots too big for him. He did not have good control of his foot plants, and the stretchy boot lacers provided no lateral ankle support. His simple step over a fallen tree ended his hunt trip. Boots are one thing you should never borrow or accept as a hand-me-down. Never consider using rubber boots for the same non-support reason. They stretch, crack in the cold, and become very wet inside from perspiration.
© 2016 -2017 Copyright by P. K. H. Groth, Denver, Colorado, USA All rights reserved - See contact page.
Pay for a Good, Perfectly Fitted Boots Or Suffer Later: I nvest in a good pair of boots for comfort and foot preservation. Make sure they are correctly fitted. They should have strong, thick Vibram soles, and have strong built-in arch support to prevent foot failure and permanent flat feet. A poor or absent arch support will also shift more body weight to the heel bottom, resulting in gradual growth of an exceedingly painful basal bone spur that may take years to get rid of. Boots should extend over and be supportive of the ankle to reduce sprains Custom Boots Fitted by Experts are Worth the Cost: People buy boots today by mail order or from a local sports store which has inexperienced salespersons. Most will never experience the wonders of perfectly fitted boots, and some will suffer future foot and ankle problems. We relocated to Denver in 1969. New backpacking friends vehemently declared we should get the best boots plus free advice from Hans the German, an eighty year old (and still playing soccer) legendary boot maker on East Colfax Avenue. He was an extremely rare find from the “old school”. If you were coming to him, you were going to receive boots that were appropriate to HIS liking. The first thing he did was to yell at his wife to prepare another customer (he was always politely but loudly yelling commands to his wife.) Linda was properly seated in a fitting chair barefooted with her old boots neatly beside her. Hans intermittently eyed her as he went about business with other customers. Hans carefully looked at Linda’s feet and then her old boots. “How bad is the pain in the left side of your neck?” he asked (actually, a tort German command). Linda had this neck pain for years and Hans instantly detected it. He knew the adage “Look at a man’s shoes and you know how he lives”. Linda got a perfect pair of boots for her narrow feet. Hans made and glued a wedge-shaped leather “cookie” at a certain place inside her boot. In a week or two, her neck pain disappeared and never returned! Hans refused to sell me the impressive stylish hiking boots I selected, demanding I buy a more farmer-looking rugged type for my “German-Italian fat feet!”. I used those relaxing boots that felt like slippers through five resolings. (Note: Peter Limmer and Sons in New Hampshire make custom boots for hard to fit feet. It may take up to three years for the boots to be made. However, they will order contract-made specialty-to-fit boots made in the former East Germany with arrival time in weeks.) . Buy Quality Boot Laces for Comfort and Safety - Good Boot Laces Are Almost Worth Their Weight in Gold! T he backcountry is not the place to wear poor grade bootlaces.There are many cheap ones on the market that stretch, break of loose their end caps. They fray, absorb water and freeze, and creep through boot eyelets. Obtain some Obenauf’s Industrial Strength Boot Laces. These quality laces are impregnated with a beeswax/resin/oil mixture. This reduces abrasion, fraying, mildew, heat and chemical damage and water saturation. Water proofed laces do not ice up and become difficult to untie. The waterproofing composition also reduces or eliminates the creeping of laces through eyelets, and thus keeps your laces tight around the foot. Properly Tie Your Boot Laces for Maximum Comfort and Foot Safety: Boot maker Hans had a big granite rock in his boot store’s tiny fitting room. You climbed on and around that rock to his commands as he observed the boots flexing and the ankles moving. Then he would teach like a child you learn how to correctly lace a boot for backpacking. This photo illustrates the proper way to tie a boot so the foot and ankle are not injured or fatigued, or a good boot ruined. The lace is pulled increasingly tighter each eyelet at a time until the break in the ankle is reached. Then the laces are wrapped around each other several times BELOW the lowest point of boot flexure (arrows). This intertwining prevents the foot’s flexing action from pulling and stretching the upper lacers downward to loosen the lower laces. The boot front retains firm lacing, thus preventing the foot from moving forward, and foot tarsal bones from spreading. You will experience less foot fatigue, toes hitting the boot front, and better walking balance. The foot will not slip forward in the boot when walking downhill; this is a dangerous time when carrying a heavy load of meat. The boot will be able to bend better at the ankle break point, and this will prevent blistering of the tender ankle front. Note: Never use lacers which stretch at all. They allow foot slippage resulting in blisters. Observations: In 2006 I encountered a limping hunter gritting his teeth as he began the descent to the valley below. He had sprained his right ankle. One look at his boots explained the cause - he had worn borrowed old boots too big for him. He did not have good control of his foot plants, and the stretchy boot lacers provided no lateral ankle support. His simple step over a fallen tree ended his hunt trip. Boots are one thing you should never borrow or accept as a hand-me-down. Never consider using rubber boots for the same non-support reason. They stretch, crack in the cold, and become very wet inside from perspiration.
Foot and Ankle Care
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